Skip to content

>Double Doses of Deepak and Denialism

January 3, 2010

>I was toying with a third item in my list, dumbasses, but then that would have been three things and the whole alliteration thing would have been lost, dang it all.  Besides, Deepak is decidedly not a dumbass. He knows exactly what he’s selling and he does so intentionally. That’s in many ways far worse than a dumbass who does buy into his woo. Dealing with Deepak’s stuff is always fun. Playing the game of trying to trip google alerts so that this blog comes up on Deepak Chopra passes the time. I’m sure there will be folks pleased when the semester starts back up and I have less free time on my hands. I tend to spend it scouring the internet looking for woo.

Sometimes, though, the woo drops right into your lap, like a pretty little gift all wrapped up in a bow and begging for you to open it. Today was that day for me. It’s a delicious feeling, a little bit bad girl, to find some woo so chockful on inanities that you can’t help but chortle out loud when you see it. I can’t help it, I’m just drawn that way. It’s so big, so juicy, so over-the-top that I passed it to Thelma because she’s larger than life, over-the-top herself and she will do a grand, bang-up job on it, all without the background information that dropped the woo present into my lap. It’s hard, truly, to let this one go. So hard.

Thelma said I shouldn’t worry, she’ll let me post it here, too, as we do all the stuff she thinks is her best. She said to wet the readers’ appetites for a foray into some mumbo-jumbo naturopathic woo, to sit tight, let her get appropriately Wild Turkeyed and into the webosphere in deep examination of said present and she’ll have something ready to go for our reading pleasure tomorrow. She wants to do it just right, she said, so I’ll sit with baited breath, read some more of Specter’s Denialism, and leave you with this oh-so-appropriate quote on what we woo fighters must do.

Recognizing “denialism when we see it”:

“As a society and as individuals, that means asking tough, skeptical questions, then demanding answers supported by compelling evidence. When the government, a company, or any other group makes a claim, we need to scrutinize that claim with care but without passion. Most importantly, we must learn to accept data that has been properly judged and verified–no matter what it says, or how much we might have wished that it pointed in another direction.” (Specter, Denialism, p. 21)

Advertisements
5 Comments
  1. January 3, 2010 2:49 am

    >Hi!The only Deepak Chopra book I have read is called Ageless Body and Timeless Mind.It talks about molecules, and crosses lines between science, pseudoscience and quantum physics.

  2. January 3, 2010 1:24 pm

    >Sorry to put this in such blunt terms, but many Neurodivesity activists would do well to follow this advice…So important is these points that I'm repeating them:"As a society and as individuals, that means asking tough, skeptical questions, then demanding answers supported by compelling evidence. … we need to scrutinize that claim with care but without passion…. we must learn to accept data that has been properly judged and verified–no matter what it says, or how much we might have wished that it pointed in another direction."In 2010, we're all facing some very serious and very grown-up issues and the eyes of the World, and Harold Doherty are on us.

  3. January 3, 2010 1:26 pm

    >"are" not "is".

  4. January 3, 2010 1:40 pm

    >Socrates,We ALL should do this. If more of us did, things like facilitated communication, for example, would be relegated to the trashheap it belongs on. Learning to react dispassionately to actual evidence and weighing its credibility is no easy feat.Adelaide,That's pretty much Chopra in a nutshell. 🙂

  5. January 3, 2010 7:08 pm

    >I include myself as a target in my own rant, so when my New Year's Resolution looks like it's crumblin' – you know where to find me and what to say 🙂

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: